Oral Hepatitis C Treatment for Indolent Lymphoma (OPTImaL) Study

NCT ID: NCT02717949


Title
Oral Hepatitis C Treatment for Indolent Lymphoma (OPTImaL) Study
Purpose
There still remains the question if hepatitis C eradication with all oral therapy will lead to a regression or cure of the low grade lymphoma. Thus, the hypothesis of this study is that oral HCV therapy will lead to a high rate of hepatitis C eradication which will correlate with a reduction of the size and extent of low-grade lymphoma. The hypothesis of this study is that subjects with hepatitis C,regardless of genotype, who have low grade lymphoma, when treated for hepatitis C without pegylated interferon will have a regression of low grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In this pilot study we will evaluate the effect of Sofosbuvir/ledipasvir or sofosbuvir/ribavirin based antiviral therapy on the course of a subset of HCV-related low grade B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma Primary Objective This study will assess the safety, as measured by adverse events, in subjects receiving hepatitis C treatment. Secondary Objective The secondary objective of this study is to assess the rate of overall response of B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma defined as either as partial response or complete response according to revised international working group criteria for non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Primary Endpoint Safety and tolerability of sofosbuvir/ledipasvir or sofosbuvir/ribavirin in subjects with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma will be assessed by number of adverse events and serious adverse events. In addition, the study will assess the number of subjects who had to stop treatment due to adverse events or serious adverse events. The study will also examine the number of subjects in which treatment for lymphoma had to be given due to clinical progression. Secondary Endpoints The secondary endpoint(s) of this study is to (1) Assess the rate of overall response of B-cell Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma defined as either as partial response or complete response according to revised international working group criteria for non-Hodgkin lymphoma. (2) Determine the rate of sustained viral response in subjects with low-grade lymphoma.
Details
Methods and Study Design The study will plans to enroll approximately 21 subjects over the next 6-12 months for this study. Subjects with low grade lymphoma with confirmed diagnosis of hepatitis C with a viral load > 1000 will be included in this study. Subjects may be treatment naïve or experienced to hepatitis C therapy, however subjects must be treatment naïve to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma treatment to be included in this study. All subjects will undergo staging studies at the time of study screening which will include a whole body scans and a bone marrow biopsy. In those with a prior bone marrow biopsy, those who had bone marrow involvement and biopsy was <3 months from screening, then an additional biopsy is not needed. If bone marrow biopsy did not show bone marrow involvement, a repeat bone marrow biopsy is needed at screening. If complete data is not available from a prior biopsy, a repeat bone marrow biopsy will need to be done. In addition, patients will have staging of liver disease by serologic markers of liver inflammation, such as aspartate aminotransferase (AST) to platelet ratio (APRI) and FibroTest® or (Fibro Sure®) or FibroScan®. If these methods are inconclusive, then a liver biopsy may be obtained to determine if the patient has cirrhosis. Patients will be treated regardless of stage of fibrosis. The rationale for examining cirrhosis is that these patients may not respond as well and will require further surveillance for hepatocellular cancer every 6 months. Additionally, hepatitis C viral load and genotype will be determined prior to initiation of hepatitis C treatment. Setting: This will be a multi- center study conducted at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Cornell Medical Center, and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Each site would be expected to enroll 7 subjects in 6-12 months. Treatment Genotype 1: Treatment Naïve, with or without cirrhosis: sofosbuvir/ledipasvir one pill once a day for 12 weeks. Treatment experienced, with cirrhosis: sofosbuvir/ledipasvir one pill once a day with weight-based ribavirin for 12 weeks. Weight-based ribavirin refers to use 1200 mg of ribavirin in divided doses for those ≥75 kg and 1000 mg in divided dose for those <75kg. Treatment experienced with cirrhosis : sofosbuvir/ledipasvir one pill once a day for 24 weeks. This option is for subjects who are unable to take ribavirin. Genotype 2: Treatment naïve or experienced without cirrhosis: sofosbuvir 400mg once daily and ribavirin 1000/1200 mg weight-based dosing in divided dose twice a day for 12 weeks.Treatment naïve or experienced with cirrhosis: sofosbuvir 400 mg and weight-based ribavirin for 16 weeks Genotype 3: Treatment naïve, non-cirrhotic: sofosbuvir/ledipasvir fixed dose combination combined with weight-based ribavirin for 12 weeks or treatment naïve with cirrhosis: sofosbuvir 400 mg daily with weight-based ribavirin for 24 weeks. Treatment experienced with cirrhosis will be excluded as the best treatment for this population would require pegylated interferon. Genotype 4: Treatment naïve with or without cirrhosis or treatment experienced without cirrhosis: sofosbuvir/Ledipasvir fixed dose combination for 12 weeks. Treatment experienced with cirrhosis: sofosbuvir/ledipasvir for 24 weeks.
Conditions
Liver Disease
Keywords
hepatitis C, low-grade lymphoma
Source
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Sponsors
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Medical College of Cornell University
Status
Recruiting
Acronym
Optimal
Last Updated
31 Mar 2016
URL
Official Link
Citations/Publications
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Peveling-Oberhag J, Arcaini L, Hansmann ML, Zeuzem S. Hepatitis C-associated B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Epidemiology, molecular signature and clinical management. J Hepatol. 2013 Jul;59(1):169-77. doi: 10.1016/j.jhep.2013.03.018. Review.

Arcaini L, Merli M, Volpetti S, Rattotti S, Gotti M, Zaja F. Indolent B-cell lymphomas associated with HCV infection: clinical and virological features and role of antiviral therapy. Clin Dev Immunol. 2012;2012:638185. doi: 10.1155/2012/638185. Review.

Kasama Y, Mizukami T, Kusunoki H, Peveling-Oberhag J, Nishito Y, Ozawa M, Kohara M, Mizuochi T, Tsukiyama-Kohara K. B-cell-intrinsic hepatitis C virus expression leads to B-cell-lymphomagenesis and induction of NF-κB signalling. PLoS One. 2014 Mar 20;9(3):e91373. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0091373.

Hermine O, Lefrère F, Bronowicki JP, Mariette X, Jondeau K, Eclache-Saudreau V, Delmas B, Valensi F, Cacoub P, Brechot C, Varet B, Troussard X. Regression of splenic lymphoma with villous lymphocytes after treatment of hepatitis C virus infection. N Engl J Med. 2002 Jul 11;347(2):89-94.

Vallisa D, Bernuzzi P, Arcaini L, Sacchi S, Callea V, Marasca R, Lazzaro A, Trabacchi E, Anselmi E, Arcari AL, Moroni C, Bertè R, Lazzarino M, Cavanna L. Role of anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment in HCV-related, low-grade, B-cell, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: a multicenter Italian experience. J Clin Oncol. 2005 Jan 20;23(3):468-73.

Arcaini L, Vallisa D, Rattotti S, Ferretti VV, Ferreri AJ, Bernuzzi P, Merli M, Varettoni M, Chiappella A, Ambrosetti A, Tucci A, Rusconi C, Visco C, Spina M, Cabras G, Luminari S, Tucci M, Musto P, Ladetto M, Merli F, Stelitano C, d'Arco A, Rigacci L, Levis A, Rossi D, Spedini P, Mancuso S, Marino D, Bruno R, Baldini L, Pulsoni A. Antiviral treatment in patients with indolent B-cell lymphomas associated with HCV infection: a study of the Fondazione Italiana Linfomi. Ann Oncol. 2014 Jul;25(7):1404-10. doi: 10.1093/annonc/mdu166.

Afdhal N, Zeuzem S, Kwo P, Chojkier M, Gitlin N, Puoti M, Romero-Gomez M, Zarski JP, Agarwal K, Buggisch P, Foster GR, Bräu N, Buti M, Jacobson IM, Subramanian GM, Ding X, Mo H, Yang JC, Pang PS, Symonds WT, McHutchison JG, Muir AJ, Mangia A, Marcellin P; ION-1 Investigators.. Ledipasvir and sofosbuvir for untreated HCV genotype 1 infection. N Engl J Med. 2014 May 15;370(20):1889-98. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1402454.

Gane EJ, Stedman CA, Hyland RH, Ding X, Svarovskaia E, Symonds WT, Hindes RG, Berrey MM. Nucleotide polymerase inhibitor sofosbuvir plus ribavirin for hepatitis C. N Engl J Med. 2013 Jan 3;368(1):34-44. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1208953.

Kowdley KV, Gordon SC, Reddy KR, Rossaro L, Bernstein DE, Lawitz E, Shiffman ML, Schiff E, Ghalib R, Ryan M, Rustgi V, Chojkier M, Herring R, Di Bisceglie AM, Pockros PJ, Subramanian GM, An D, Svarovskaia E, Hyland RH, Pang PS, Symonds WT, McHutchison JG, Muir AJ, Pound D, Fried MW; ION-3 Investigators.. Ledipasvir and sofosbuvir for 8 or 12 weeks for chronic HCV without cirrhosis. N Engl J Med. 2014 May 15;370(20):1879-88. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1402355.

Lawitz E, Poordad FF, Pang PS, Hyland RH, Ding X, Mo H, Symonds WT, McHutchison JG, Membreno FE. Sofosbuvir and ledipasvir fixed-dose combination with and without ribavirin in treatment-naive and previously treated patients with genotype 1 hepatitis C virus infection (LONESTAR): an open-label, randomised, phase 2 trial. Lancet. 2014 Feb 8;383(9916):515-23. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(13)62121-2. Erratum in: Lancet. 2014 Mar 8;383(9920):870.

Zeuzem S, Dusheiko GM, Salupere R, Mangia A, Flisiak R, Hyland RH, Illeperuma A, Svarovskaia E, Brainard DM, Symonds WT, Subramanian GM, McHutchison JG, Weiland O, Reesink HW, Ferenci P, Hézode C, Esteban R; VALENCE Investigators.. Sofosbuvir and ribavirin in HCV genotypes 2 and 3. N Engl J Med. 2014 May 22;370(21):1993-2001. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1316145.

Locations
United States