Does Anxiety in Children on the Day of Surgery Impact Compliance in the Ophthalmology Clinic?

NCT ID: NCT02704442


Title
Does Anxiety in Children on the Day of Surgery Impact Compliance in the Ophthalmology Clinic?
Purpose
The hypothesis is that pediatric patients with increased levels of anxiety on the day of surgery, in particular at point of anesthetic induction, will demonstrate decreased compliance with assessment in ophthalmology clinic postoperatively.
Details
There are many studies demonstrating pediatric anxiety from a surgical experience leading to postoperative maladaptive behaviors such as nightmares, separation anxiety, eating problems, and increased fear of doctors. There is a significant amount of research looking at day of surgery anxiety and pain in children and possible modifiers. Very little work has explored the effect of maladaptive behaviors with follow up physician visits. Strabismus surgery is particularly important as children require early and regular follow up assessments after surgery for optimal outcome. These assessments are meticulous and require good patient cooperation in order to obtain useful information for the pediatric ophthalmologist. The study hypothesis is that pediatric patients with increased levels of anxiety on the day of surgery, in particular at point of anesthetic induction, will demonstrate decreased compliance with assessment in ophthalmology clinic postoperatively. The investigators expect this decrease in compliance will be evident based on changes seen on the ophthalmology clinic compliance scores generated pre and postoperatively. The proposed study will be a prospective cross sectional study. Investigators will be measuring compliance in the ophthalmology clinic pre and postoperative and relating any changes in compliance with anxiety levels on the day of surgery.
Conditions
Anxiety, Strabismus, Compliance
Keywords
anesthesiology, ophthalmology
Source
Queen's University
Sponsors
Queen's University, University of Regina
Status
Recruiting
Acronym
Last Updated
03 Mar 2016
URL
Official Link
Citations/Publications
Kain ZN, Caldwell-Andrews AA. Preoperative psychological preparation of the child for surgery: an update. Anesthesiol Clin North America. 2005 Dec;23(4):597-614, vii. Review.

Kain ZN, Mayes LC, Caldwell-Andrews AA, Karas DE, McClain BC. Preoperative anxiety, postoperative pain, and behavioral recovery in young children undergoing surgery. Pediatrics. 2006 Aug;118(2):651-8.

Kain ZN, Wang SM, Mayes LC, Caramico LA, Hofstadter MB. Distress during the induction of anesthesia and postoperative behavioral outcomes. Anesth Analg. 1999 May;88(5):1042-7.

Varughese AM, Nick TG, Gunter J, Wang Y, Kurth CD. Factors predictive of poor behavioral compliance during inhaled induction in children. Anesth Analg. 2008 Aug;107(2):413-21. doi: 10.1213/ane.0b013e31817e616b.

Kain ZN, Mayes LC, Wang SM, Caramico LA, Hofstadter MB. Parental presence during induction of anesthesia versus sedative premedication: which intervention is more effective? Anesthesiology. 1998 Nov;89(5):1147-56; discussion 9A-10A.

Wollin SR, Plummer JL, Owen H, Hawkins RM, Materazzo F. Predictors of preoperative anxiety in children. Anaesth Intensive Care. 2003 Feb;31(1):69-74.

Wright KD, Stewart SH, Finley GA. When are parents helpful? A randomized clinical trial of the efficacy of parental presence for pediatric anesthesia. Can J Anaesth. 2010 Aug;57(8):751-8. doi: 10.1007/s12630-010-9333-1.

Kim JE, Jo BY, Oh HM, Choi HS, Lee Y. High anxiety, young age and long waits increase the need for preoperative sedatives in children. J Int Med Res. 2012;40(4):1381-9.

Kain ZN, Mayes LC, Cicchetti DV, Bagnall AL, Finley JD, Hofstadter MB. The Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale: how does it compare with a "gold standard"? Anesth Analg. 1997 Oct;85(4):783-8.

Locations
Canada