The STRENGTH Study: Shapely Sisters Targeting Realistic Exercise and Nutrition Goals Through Healthy Habits

NCT ID: NCT02253641


Title
The STRENGTH Study: Shapely Sisters Targeting Realistic Exercise and Nutrition Goals Through Healthy Habits
Purpose
This study evaluates the efficacy of a stress-focused tailored weight loss intervention compared to a standard weight loss intervention on weight loss in severely obese (BMI > 40.0) African American women.
Details
Stress has been identified as a major barrier to engaging in healthy lifestyle behaviors (e.g. diet and exercise) among African American women. African American women consistently lose less weight than their Caucasian counterparts in weight loss interventions. One reason for this disparity may be due to the failure of most weight loss interventions to address stress management adequately or in a culturally competent way. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a stress-focused tailored weight loss intervention compared to a standard weight loss intervention on weight loss in severely obese (BMI > 40.0) African American women. The stress-focused weight loss intervention will incorporate stress management content throughout the entire intervention and will include content that is culturally tailored. The standard weight loss intervention will cover stress management techniques during one of the 14 sessions and the material will be more generic in nature (e.g. not culturally tailored).
Conditions
Obesity
Keywords
African American, Women, Weight Loss
Source
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Sponsors
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
Status
Completed
Acronym
Last Updated
19 Sep 2015
URL
Official Link
Citations/Publications
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Goodpaster BH, Delany JP, Otto AD, Kuller L, Vockley J, South-Paul JE, Thomas SB, Brown J, McTigue K, Hames KC, Lang W, Jakicic JM. Effects of diet and physical activity interventions on weight loss and cardiometabolic risk factors in severely obese adults: a randomized trial. JAMA. 2010 Oct 27;304(16):1795-802. doi: 10.1001/jama.2010.1505.

Ryan DH, Johnson WD, Myers VH, Prather TL, McGlone MM, Rood J, Brantley PJ, Bray GA, Gupta AK, Broussard AP, Barootes BG, Elkins BL, Gaudin DE, Savory RL, Brock RD, Datz G, Pothakamuri SR, McKnight GT, Stenlof K, Sjöström LV. Nonsurgical weight loss for extreme obesity in primary care settings: results of the Louisiana Obese Subjects Study. Arch Intern Med. 2010 Jan 25;170(2):146-54. doi: 10.1001/archinternmed.2009.508.

West DS, Elaine Prewitt T, Bursac Z, Felix HC. Weight loss of black, white, and Hispanic men and women in the Diabetes Prevention Program. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jun;16(6):1413-20. doi: 10.1038/oby.2008.224. Erratum in: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009 Nov;17(11):2119-20.

Cox TL, Krukowski R, Love SJ, Eddings K, DiCarlo M, Chang JY, Prewitt TE, West DS. Stress management-augmented behavioral weight loss intervention for African American women: a pilot, randomized controlled trial. Health Educ Behav. 2013 Feb;40(1):78-87. doi: 10.1177/1090198112439411.

Samuel-Hodge CD, Headen SW, Skelly AH, Ingram AF, Keyserling TC, Jackson EJ, Ammerman AS, Elasy TA. Influences on day-to-day self-management of type 2 diabetes among African-American women: spirituality, the multi-caregiver role, and other social context factors. Diabetes Care. 2000 Jul;23(7):928-33.

Fitzgibbon ML, Tussing-Humphreys LM, Porter JS, Martin IK, Odoms-Young A, Sharp LK. Weight loss and African-American women: a systematic review of the behavioural weight loss intervention literature. Obes Rev. 2012 Mar;13(3):193-213. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-789X.2011.00945.x. Review.

Locations
United States